About Sheldon

Mission Statement

Sheldon High School is a place of respect, integrity and learning. Its mission is to provide students a challenging, comprehensive education enabling them to function as responsible citizens and to adapt to a changing world.

Program Description

Sheldon High School provides all students the opportunity to learn in a caring and supportive environment. The curriculum is rigorous to meet the Oregon State Standards and the KSUS College Readiness Standards. Our school community challenges students, staff and families to create a student-centered culture that emphasizes intellectual excellence and respect for the qualities each member brings to our community.

School Highlights

Sheldon High School offers humanities programs that include honors, Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate courses, offered in both a traditional and international studies format.

Sheldon hosts the following specialized programs: International High School (International Studies); Life Skills Network (Special Education); Sheldon Alternative Academy.

Sheldon offers a wide variety of career courses in art, broadcasting (radio and television), business, human services, computer technology and environmental studies.’

Sheldon has many co-curricular programs including student government, National Honor Society, drama, a host of clubs and activities, and 21 sports providing opportunities for both men and women.

Sheldon provides advisory programs to develop relationships and to address career-related learning standards.

School Improvement Goals

Community: Engage all stakeholders in activities that build, foster and improve our sense of Sheldon community

Physical Environment: Improve the use of Sheldon High School’s physical space to provide a functional, safe and more welcoming environment for all stakeholders

Curriculum: All students will be provided access to learning, including opportunities to achieve their individual academic potential and to enrich their total school experience
Other Information: Sheldon provides a curriculum that is relevant to each student’s future career and educational endeavors after high school.

Location

2455 Willakenzie Rd – Eugene OR, 97401
Grades: 9-12
Enrollment: 1564
Feeder schools: Monroe & Cal Young
School Colors
: Green, Blue and White
ODE school report cards and AYP reports

Governing Bodies

Each academic discipline (i.e., department) elects one faculty representative with voting privileges for the group (each group contains approximately 4-10 FTE).  The Student Achievement Leadership Team (S.A.L.T.)  also includes one or more non-voting representative from IHS and one or more non-voting administrative representative.

The elected representatives form a group that advises  administration in matters including curriculum, instruction, assessment, scheduling and other student achievement matters for Sheldon.  Members of this team also have other duties as “Site Council”members.

Site Council is a governing body that includes SALT members , Parents, and Administration. Decisions are made on the school Improvement Plan, professional development activities, student clubs, and EEF Grants.

Who is Sheldon High School named for?

Henry D. Sheldon 1874-1948

Following is an excerpt by Martin Schmitt written for the Oregon Historical Quarterly in March 1951.

Henry D_ Sheldon w150Henry D. Sheldon was one of the Northwest’s foremost educators during the first half of this century, helping to build Oregon’s public high school system, the school of education at the University of Oregon and the university itself.

Sheldon came to Oregon at a time when education as a curriculum was just beginning to emerge from a group of courses that included psychology, philosophy, and pedagogy (teaching). He was a pioneer in child psychology and educational inquiry. Sheldon’s attempts to broaden the professional education curriculum, and raise the standards of teacher education form a major theme of his earlier letters.

Dr. Sheldon immediately understood that improved teacher training in Oregon was a useless effort unless the condition of secondary schools underwent a concurrent major improvement.